+44 (0)20 8004 2000
  • Home
  • News
  • Global Vocational Skills (GVS) attends Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) Conference 2019
Global Vocational Skills (GVS) attends Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) Conference 2019

Global Vocational Skills (GVS) attends Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) Conference 2019

Global Vocational Skills (GVS) newest addition to the team, Adrian Daniels, Business Development Manager, attended the 2019 CVER Conference at London School of Economics (LSE), the fourth annual conference held at the LSE premises on Lincoln Fields.

Talks explored topics ranging from Immigration matters to Technological changes in skills, which in turn provided a broad wealth of insights into the current and future climate of Vocational and Technical Education worldwide. Speakers included Eric Bettinger, originating as far as theprestigious Stanford University in the United States, who flew in to deliver a compelling keynote on Student Pathways in Vocational Colleges. The main takeaway here was that Students who take the initiative to explore learning are more likely to be successful (self-guided), than with students relying on Staff to guide them (guided pathways). What was interesting to learn, was the innovation and tactics being used in the US to prevent college students abandoning their study programmes, using tools such as personalised text messages sent out automatically, to help understand the challenges of the student. Ultimately, the data is used to help the Community colleges in the US provide students with a better direction in their study pathway to reduce college dropouts. This is something that Jamie Rawsthorne, Founder of Unique Insights, aims to achieve for University Students in the UK. 

Meanwhile, other talks dived into other topics, such as The Evaluation of Post- Compulsory Education Partners, where different educational pathways, such as FE and HE, for school leavers where evaluated. Andy Dickerson and Damon Morris from The University of Sheffield explored this matter further. They mentioned that Apprenticeship and Vocational Level 3 routes are very poorly predicted, whilst those that come through NVQ Level 3 pathways have a lower income and employability over A-level and HE routes. A suggestion was made that Parents’ afternoons rather than Evenings could fit in better with work/life balance and even improve educational career outcomes for students moving forward. 

Whilst some of the Education Economists held back their research from the public, one of the professors from Switzerland, Professor Dr. Uschi Backes-Gellner, was kind enough to publish his keynote paper from day one of the conference: Vocational Education and Training (VET) and innovation

prev_04.png